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Scott McTominay: the glue holding together Man Utd’s midfield…

Send your thoughts to theeditor@football365.com… The new Fletch Whilst not giddy with optimism for the season ahead, nor am I downbeat about United’s prospects, but I would like to take a moment to talk about the young man currently holding our very sketchy midfield together; Scott McTominay. When he first came into the side, seemingly as part of some bizarre point scoring exercise by Jose, I didn’t think much of him. He wasn’t quick, he wasn’t overtly tenacious, didn’t seem a wonderful technician or a graceful, Carrick-lite passer of the ball. There were no obvious strengths to this young man. Then, with each passing game, he got steadily better and I realised that I’d seen this before. 16 years ago, Sir Alex introduced a young Scottish midfielder into the Manchester United first team and my mates and I were perplexed. Often shunted out to the right flank, he too lacked searing pace, wonderful technique or incisive passing ability. What on earth did Fergie see in him that we didn’t? As always, Sir knew best and we were fools as a few years later, Darren Fletcher was a key part of the squad. Never the star, not even necessarily in your first XI, but almost always starting the difficult away matches, he became a really important part of the setup and proved my, and many others, initial doubts wrong through hard work, application and tactical discipline. If it weren’t for unfortunate illness that blighted his later career, he’d have made many more appearances for the club. I expect McTominay to follow in his footsteps, relying on a lack of weaknesses and hard work rather than abundant natural ability. We’ll have flashier players, ones that sell more shirts abroad, but like Fletcher, I think he’s a cult, terrace hero in the making. Could probably do with signing him some help, mind… Lewis, Busby Way   Cash for clicks The latest to chime in is Pogba’s brother. If the story dies out for a few days, the next rent a quote is wheeled out. This says to me, along with all long running transfer “sagas” is that there is something within the image rights of the player that allows their image and name to be used in generating clicks. It’s the same with Neymar and many others. It appears to be dead, then it chirps up again. Is there anyone out there who has an insight into the image rights contracts for players and what it demands and entails? I wouldn’t be surprised if there was a clause entered into certain players contracts that allow the use of their name to generate online advertising revenue. Happy to be proved wrong, but as with all contracts in football, no-one really knows any of the detail, which will always give rise to conspiracy theories. I mean, who believes Alexis Sanchez is on £500,000 per week? Fat Man (Add Alexis Sanchez, Man Utd, Neymar, Pogba – this mail is clickbait gold!)   When is a trophy not a trophy? Yesterday I wrote in about whether the Community Shield and the Super Cup should be considered “major honours”. In rereading the afternoon mailbox, it occurred to me that there is one point very few people have mentioned (including me ): The Community Shield allows 6 substitutions per team in 90 minutes. This makes the competition different, and more “friendly-esque”, to any other trophy competed for in European football. Not only is this different from the UEFA Super Cup, it’s also different from the other national equivalents in Germany, France, Italy and Spain. So, despite what I wrote earlier, there is actually a pretty strong argument to class the Community Shield a friendly, if you are so inclined. Personally, I still think the Community Shield should be counted and taken seriously. In a parallel with the transfer window deadline, even though England are on their own and everyone else does it differently, I think those rules make the most sense; everyone else should align with best practice. The Super Cup would have benefited from having 6 substitutions, and the vast majority of fans would have preferred to go straight to a shootout on 90 minutes (by the time we left the stadium last night, it was around 1:30AM local time). Oliver Dziggel, Geneva Switzerland   …I don’t think Liverpool and their fans are being disingenuous when they count their trophies and leave out the Community Shield. Reasons why Community Shield is not counted but the Super Cup is: I. Community Shield: a. It allows SIX subs during normal time, and hence it is more of a friendly than a competitive match. b. It goes to penalties right after 90 minutes, again just like a pre-season friendly. c. Just a few years ago, it could be a ‘shared’ trophy in case of a tie. That’s just weird. d. It also allows a non-winner of a trophy to enter in it. If its a one-off match that gives out a trophy, at least it needs to be between two Champions. Make it PL winner vs the Championship winner if all domestic trophies were won by one team. e. They themselves call it a shield, and not a trophy to differentiate whats real and whats not (Ok, one this one I am joking… but only a bit) II. Super Cup does none of the above making it a proper football match with the same competitive rules that are worthy of any final. Having said that, I know LFC fans and ex-players alike wanted to win the community shield this year desperately, so did Klopp, and so did I… Why!? Because it’s a match versus our current rivals who we have some bad blood with in the recent past and I wanted to win it even more after I remembered the way the City players sang the mock version of Allez Allez mocking LFC. (And they call us Unbearables) And finally, remember all the tweets and whatnots when Man Utd fans were singing gleefully that they now have 45 major trophies after they won Europa League a couple of years ago, one more than Liverpool…? And today magically they want to include the Community Shield as a major trophy? A bit disingenuous that don’t you think? Nikhil, LFC, Chicago   Ref justice Watched the UEFA Super Cup and was impressed not necessarily by the officiating – we are the same species and generally have the same flaws, specifically 2 eyes too close together to see a player kick a ball 70...

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Published By: Fottball 365 - 7 days ago







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